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Corcaigh, Ireland

Blogs

The Cloud of Unknowing – Easter

by Anne Crossey   Researching Easter, I discovered all sorts of interesting odds and sods. While Easter was originally celebrated by Christians on the day of the Jewish holiday, Passover, it was changed by Emperor Constantine I at the Council of Nicaea in 325 C.E., to be fixed by astronomical events, which puts Easter approximately at the first Sunday after the Paschal Full Moon- that being the Full Moon following

Hedgerows, a valuable part of our landscape

by Nikki Darrell (For Cork Branch of the Irish Wildlife Trust) Hedgerows may be a habitat that was originally planted by humans but then we are part of nature too and these habitats serve many valuable purposes. They act as windbreaks, help with land drainage and healthy water tables, and provide food and shelter for many small mammals, birds and insects. Hedgerows also act as ‘highways’ for these creatures to

An Emigrant’s Diary – Permanent Residency

In this series, Clon girl Sharon Whelton who has moved to Canada gives us an insight into what life is like for Ireland’s new generation of emigrants.   Thankfully the snow seems to have eased off quite a bit since I last wrote, and we can finally see the grass in our garden – it may look orange and dead, but we can see it! The weather has fluctuated quite

Confessions of a Learner Gardener – Slug Control

It’s been a dry week, with plenty of sun, some wind and not much in the way of rain. Dry conditions haven’t been putting off the slugs though. Not satisfied with devouring the lettuce, mustard, peas and parsley they moved onto the broad beans. Inside the tunnel they haven’t been quite as destructive but they’ve munched courgette leaves, nibbled lettuce and generally been a right royal slimy pain in the

Rural Eye – LEADER Changes Will Hinder Community Development

“Putting People First” is Minister Phil Hogan’s action plan for Local Government. The plan sets out to broaden the involvement of Local authorities, which will include   radical changes on how the LEADER programme will be delivered in the future and includes plans for local authority-led structures to take over the programme. However this will seriously threaten the future of groups such as West Cork Development Partnership (WCDP) which is a

The Winning Post – money talks

by Stable Lad   In the horse racing world, being a millionaire vastly increases your chances of coming across an animal who would be regarded, following a very successful racing career, as something of a legend in the realms of the sport, and, as a result of this, if a colt, will be worth a veritable fortune in the business of going to stud. This, of course, is due to

The benefts of fish farming

Dear Sir,   I refer to the letter carried by your paper this week by Alec O’Donovan of Save Bantry Bay entitled ‘opposition to fish farming’ and wish to respond.   Marine Harvest’s recent meeting with the Irish Government, to which the author refers, was held to discuss the many jobs and opportunities open to Ireland through the global growth of aquaculture. Another item on the agenda was how Ireland

Documenting Ireland’s islands

by Dolly O’ Reilly   The 2011 census puts the number of island dwellers off the Irish coast at 2,896. The Comhar na nOileán website provides a map of these islands and the number of inhabitants on each. Out of a total of 32 islands, five are now listed an uninhabited (these five islands each had one person living on them according to the 2006 census).

Muskerry woman seeking Euro seat

”’I am driven, passionate and committed to creating a change for the betterment of our people,” so says Muskerry woman Liadh Ní Riada who is Sinn Féin’s candidate in the upcoming European Parliament election on May 23rd. Ní Riada is the party’s National Gaeilge Officer and the youngest daughter of the iconic composer and musician, Seán O’ Riada.

Confessions of a Learner Gardener – Shirley Poppies and Pink Fizz

by Daisy Wilson APRIL  has arrived, the clocks have changed meaning a week’s worth of confusion talking about old time and new time, and the evenings are stretching grandly towards nine o’clock. Everywhere there are signs that spring is well and truly under way. The hedgerows are brimming with sunny spots of shimmery yellow wood celandine and buttery yellow primroses. Willows, already bedecked in catkins, are now leafing up, a