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Corcaigh, Ireland

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Confessions of a Learner Gardener – Yarrow and Aubergines

Oh the heat! The humidity! Though I’m definitely not complaining; this is the best summer I can remember for a long time, with long warm evenings perfect for gardening. Full of motivation we’ve begun digging a brand new flower bed at the end of the lawn.  It’s large, I’m guesstimating three metres by four. But I’ve no clue really, except that I’m relieved not to be the primary digger. Its

The Cloud of Unknowing -Art Matters

Everybody is influenced by art- it is a language that speaks non-verbally across class, religion and all other political boundaries. Art is a part of our culture and identity- indeed, the history of our art continues to live on in the present through the imposing architecture of the past, through the national galleries and museums which are often a focal point for visitors who want to understand and appreciate our

An Emigrant’s Diary – saying goodbye

In this series, Clon girl Sharon Whelton who has moved to Calgary, Canada, gives us an insight into what life is like for Ireland’s new generation of emigrants.   I can’t believe that Ciara and Clare are back in Ireland – their time in Calgary absolutely flew by. It great to have them stay and visit with us, and we had such a great three weeks together. I must say,

Rural Eye – The Irish Hare: Man’s Iconic Friend

The Irish hare (Lepus timidus) is a subspecies of the mountain hare and is found only in Ireland. The presence of the Irish hare is widespread throughout the rural countryside and is found in habitats such as coastal dunes, rich pastures to mountainous areas. Hare density often fluctuates from year to year and often from habitat to habitat. The importance of the Irish hare is not just its uniqueness or

Letters – Green Paper on Energy Policy

Dear Editor,   May I draw your readers’ attention to the closing date of 31st July for submissions on the Green Paper on Energy Policy in Ireland? We are fortunate to live in a democracy where we are all given the opportunity to contribute to national policy. Once the closing date has passed, that opportunity will have passed, and we will be bound by the regulations that derive from the

The Winning Post – Non-runners

by Stable Lad   Have you noticed recently the number of non-runners that we encounter each weekend as the season goes by, also, although not for the same reason, the number of handicaps that are cropping up at every single meeting? Over last weekend we had the guts of around 40 withdrawals, which makes the punters task in picking winners all the harder. This is the time of year, of

The Cloud of Unknowing – About time

“One must have chaos in one, to give birth to a dancing star” -       Nietzsche     There’s a funny thing about time and our place in it and I have been thinking about it a lot recently. We tend to measure time by the clock- the minutes, hours and days marking out our allotted period of living grace- and yet here we all are, every one of us, every

An Emigrant’s Diary – Down at the rodeo

In this series Clon girl Sharon Whelton who has emigrated to Calgary, Canada, gives us an insight into what life is like for Ireland’s new generation of emigrants.   The girls made it to Calgary safe and sound, and they both love it here so far. The weather has been absolutely stunning since they arrived, so they are certainly lucky to be able to sit out in the garden during

Rural Eye – Centralisation: An Affliction for Rural Communities

Robert W. Flack once wrote: “Local government is the foundation of democracy. If it fails. Democracy will fail”. Yet, a whole tier of local democracy, including 83 directly elected town councils were removed through the local government reform legislation, which was signed into law on January 27th 2014, without any reference to the Irish people. In contrast, Seanad Éireann, a marginally relevant institution, could not be abolished without a referendum.